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approach to foreign policy. our tenants of foreign policy have not changed we insist on our rice rite an rights and we t negotiate. this can be achieved best through construction gea negotiation. >> first of all, what has happened, nick, since this deal was made and are there signs of how this is going to work? >> yeah, john, i think their initial reaction is tentatively positive. iran has allowed inspects yors intinspectors intoa plutonium pl meet in sr sri sr sri vienna ane we going to implement this how are we going to ensure that the plutonium plant document get dot turned on and how can we ensure that the enrichment will be diluted enough but the initial signs are positive. >> why is arri nf going on this tour. >> we have talked a lot about israeli opposition to t to to t. israel is not the only country opposed to this deal sawe saudi arabia has quitely led opposition to the bomb. and there has been opposition between iran and saudi arabia. iran wants to say we are a regional super power and the u.s. has given us the capacity to enrich uranium and we are going to be here and we'r
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
in the middle east. yearss a look at his 10 so far at the state department and the overall foreign-policy challenges that the obama administration faces. we will show all we can. is the policy director to talk about foreign policy challenges. welcome. they are reporting that they are talking about details. you concerns about the deal overall? guest: they are working out the devils of this plan. this is a line is deal we could have done a lot better. under that deal, the united states is starting to dismantle international sanctions. iran is not dismantling a single centrifuge. it is not starting to dismantle the heavywater reactor which a once called al plutonium bomb factory. sanctions andving spring of $7 billion to as much as $20 billion in the financial assets as well as exports after chemicals, the automobile industry and other things. bringing up a lot of money. it is not clear the concessions we got are really worth that. you have seen them move as early as last week. movement inno real terms of really constraining it, the sanctions might kick in. think they will bring this? >> par
with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a man who wanted to help the world. >> he was very gregarious, very happy person, great personality, very, very warm. unfortunately, that's changed quite a bit in the past four years. people don't recognize him when they see pictures of him. >> decades of humanitarian work across the globe led the 60-year-old to cuba, the goal, setting up internet access for cuba's small jewish communities. now he languished in a jail cell. he has lost weight, his help, he feels like he has been forgotten and left to die. >> what could be worse than thinking your government isn't doing anything to bring you home. >> reporter: support
. the u s foreign policy chief catherine ashton will be traveling to ukraine later this week. france says it will begin to disarm the fighters in the central african republic by force if necessary. soldiers are patrolling the capital by me as well as other towns. some one thousand six hundred french troops are in the country as part of the un mandate to restore order nearly four hundred people have been killed since sectarian fighting began on thursday. many residents are fearful to leave their homes it's nonstop reports to the cheers of locals some of the sixteen hundred french soldiers deployed to the central african republic iran eighteen ninety the president to be living in fear of sectarian violence that left hundreds dead francaise the weekends its intervention got number one already in the ninja reasons the first priority for the troops and disarming former seneca rebels have been terrorizing the population. we ate. for now we're told sean that be a present and strong to show all these organize groups in the cities and forests. at the time if you can achieve is over. so tomorrow i
have tried to be supportive. there have been various foreign- policy initiatives that i have not attacked him and try to be supportive of him on. on the drug issues, it has taken him a while, but he is now doing something about some of the minimums.bill in -- on infrastructure, there is a way that infrastructure only for the trip across america, we could have more infrastructure money is all the money earned overseas by american corporations, nearly $2 trillion from it could be brought home. andit at five % -- at 5%, probably hundreds of billions of dollars in money comes home, but justin tax revenue, at 5%, you would doubled the money we have available for infrastructure and if we could just tax it at 5%. win-win solution. we lowered the tax rate. we get more revenue and we build some roads. and i talked to the president about that, and the president cbo score is a loss of revenue because it is not coming in at 35%. 0% is coming home. we have to overcome the cbo score on this. i said, that's vote to overturn -- let's vote to overturn all the other roles, let's vote to overtu
of that opportunity. we have a new government in iran with a different approach to foreign policy. they have not changed. we will insist on our rights. we will not negotiate or compromise on the rights of our people. we believe this can be addressed through constructive engagement. the window of opportunity is limited. >> israel is not impressed from comments from the iranian foreign minister. there's no shortage of finger pointing between the two countries. reaction from jerusalem, from nick schifrin. >> here in jerusalem the israelis are smarting over the terms and deal made with iran. israel tried privately and publicly to convince the u.s. not to make the deal. now it's trying to get the concessions it was trying to get earlier. they have four or five months to do that. earlier today i was talking to the spokeman for the foreign ministry and he described exactly what israel wants. >> the essentials is to dismantle capacity that iran can get for a peaceful program from abroad like other countries do. it will mean dismantling plutonium, it only serves for military purposes. it will have to
a tougher stand on foreign policy issues to shore up his popularity, and the senkakku islands or the diaoyu island islands dispute is very sensitive in chine ha. leaders cannot afterward to be weak in dealing with japan or the united states. >> biden's visit is seen as tangible evidence of the u.s. pivot. it's a strategy recovering from the recent debacle at the apec meeting of regional leaders, a meeting that the u.s. president withdrew from at the last minute because of his domestic budget crisis, leaving an assertive china to fill the void. >> after president obama pulled oust his visit, it was up to biden to play catch up. ease tensions and a reminder that america is still a pacific power. >> one of the hezbollah senior leaders was killed in beirut. he was shot outside his home. the armed group says he survived several attempts on his life and a 2006 war with israel. let's join andrew simmonds, live from beirut. >> tell us about who lakis was and the circumstances of his death. >> well, the attack took place outside his home, as you said there, he was driving back from work around midni
have a foreign policy which has a strat eachic period in this region. and we believe that we need. to in fact, contain the spread of sectarian divided in region. we believe sectarianism is dangerous for the entire region. iran is certainly not interested in promoting that. in fact, we have talked to everybody from the very first days of assuming. i visited iraq and the core of my discussion with all iraqis, post shiia, kurd and arab was the need to contain the sectarian divide. we believe that is a fire that can engulf the entire region and beyond and we believe it is in the interest of every single state in the region as well as all of the peoples of the region to build on our commonalities and we have a great deal of commonality. fighting in syria, the border with lebanon is escalating. seven children have been he can executed there. the badge for the town is still underway. andrew simmons has been talking to some of the eyewitnesses to the fight. this is the only way out for syrian refugees escaping the battle of calamon. the slow down on the trail of those crossing the border
by the foreign policy advisors as well as his defense minister as well as the economic affairs minister was also present in those talks, the two sides reaffirming their commitment to continue the strategic partnership between the united states and pakistan, however, the pakistan need was still concerned about the ongoing drone strikes in pakistan against where there is considerable anger now and most of the political parties that were blocking the nato supplies from going into afghanistan are still continuing with their protests. the americans would be concerned because they would be conducting a major logistic operation from withdrawing the hardware from the country and will be needing pakistans for the exercise and therefore there was a lot to talk about between washington and islamabad but the pakistans are trying to improve ties with u.s. and said high-level contacts between the two countries were helping matters. >> reporter: still ahead in sport we will have the latest from the series as australia continues dominance over england right after the break. ♪ consider this: the news of the d
this foreign policy debates, very active in the discussion about vietnam, algeria, the soviet union. he also did something kind of interesting, he chaired a special committee to determine the five best senators in american history. this was a committee that lyndon johnson created for himself, grew tired of it, handed it off to ken kennedy -- kennedy. so this was in some sense the one project that kennedy was in charge of during his senate career. he took it very seriously, you know, inquired of all the great historians in the country and spent six, seven months really digging into this, came up with a list of the five greatest senators, and it was something that became part of his identity as being a young politician, but also someone very steeped in american history. so -- >> who came out at the top of that list? >> el, there was robert taft and robert concern. [inaudible] were the two 20th century ones. but the big ones were john calhoun, daniel webster, henry clay. the great triumvirate of the pre-civil war era. so kennedy's committee quickly decided on the top three, webster, clay, calho
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
work on northern ireland. she was a foreign-policy adviser to the ted kennedy and i think mayor bloomberg on the right? an interesting combination. and she's written a couple of books, good books, and she is now working on the president's declassification efforts. so she knows a lot about those documents. so, welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you, to give you first hand a chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you have had out here. we are going to have a brief discussion from that of an albright -- madeleine albright. i won't take your time and introducing of them again. we will have a little discussion with them and then take a few questions from the audience and then wrap it up abou around 3:0t which point we will have a short break and then the president will come so let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] >> is this on? first we want to thank the clinton library and obviously stephanie streett. the peace process is something that we are all proud of. it one of his many lasting legacie
of a foreign policy plus economy plus. internal policies towards towards european standards and these countries much less vulnerable. except the two countries and who the defense much less on rapture does this to mean achievement of this garment and european path seems much less. i'm much more irreversible in georgia and also in moldova and ukraine uranus they are just getting back with wooten said. when you hear him talk about. it's more a pogrom in a revolution what's your reaction. while i said that after all the pc from kiev that found that the man i stopped it from a school with the station continued to kiss him the station. that's crackdown this happened definitely lost the will the question is by food. and for what reason and he is in the trees in seoul. and it was some opposition forces that ended with the government's offices and its ilk to the truth that to be nice to get that sits at the estate and to speak about that. i think that russia should not have the last word to this. don't pollute your toes into insanity to me well you can take conspiracy theories. we spend the rest to my o
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
.s. foreign policy so they have to get on board at some point. later this week in bahrain, foreign ministers from the united states, from the u.k., gulf states, egypt will be meeting and sitting down. they invited their iranian counterpart as well. we can learn more about how this agreement is going to play out. >> yeah. so we'll have to see how that plans out, hadley. another follow-up. cutting things, that's interesting when we're wondering what was going to happen with iran. >> exactly. he gave me a wink. he said there was going to be fights with the ministries. he didn't want to touch education or hurt welfare basically spending. he doesn't want to hurt the israeli middle class because the middle class are the people that elected him. he's a former news man himself. he's coming in from the outside. he went after defense spending. it is a bit tricky when you're surrounded in the region, but he said it's something we have to take a look at. >> hadley, thanks for that. great stuff. the latest from tel aviv. still to come on "worldwide exchange." who needs twitter? i'm joined by the nasdaq s
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
important tools of foreign-policy which as secretary gates and other secretaries of defense have made clear, the state department budget is unique in comparison with the defense budget but again an awful lot of benefit from some of those state department both in terms of assistance, economic assistance and other forms of assistance and it's that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. although i would say in the senate we have more, much more bipartisan support so for example senator lindsey graham and senator john mccain have been very big supporters of a robust state department budget as well. but in the house certainly some of our colleagues on the public inside a specially broadly defined as the tea party folks, i mean they have got, it's been really difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that assistance. but again this is a constant back-and-forth and if you look at the house republican budget over the ten-year period it dramatically dramatically, it would dramatically cut
because its proxy, hezbollah, carries out its foreign policy. his lolba has continuously attacked israel over the decades and is instrumental in fighting the coalition of syrian revolution forces. it's a rebel group which the u.s. recognizes as a legitimate representative of the syrian people. let us not forget iran's intrusion on u.s. soil. the iranian hostage try crisis of 1979 began with an attack on and subsequent occupation of the u.s. emmascy. 52 americans were held hostage for 444 days. the attack had the support of iran's then-leader, ayatollah khomeini. it was a clear violation of international diplomatic protocol. the iranian president mea several years -- claims that their nuclear program is for peaceful pump, saying iran's only desire is to diversify its energy production capabilities. yet iran has not only refused to reverse course on enriching uranium, they have developed faster.enrich uranium recently freshman members of the foreign affair committees sent a bipartisan letter to president obama telling him to be vigilant in diplomatic actions with iranis. any diplomatic dis
is there and works very closely with the obama administration and there is no political litmus test on foreign policy and economics free market. but on social issues, we are quite diverse and there were many obama voters the reason for selection. >> host: cheryl is in texas. please go ahead with your question. >> caller: yes, i am a high school engineering teacher and i find most girls don't necessarily want to take my class. his pay and quality the reason we are pushing girls and two boys traditional occupations? and if we increase the pay, would that solve the problem? >> host: can you tell us about your experience as an engineer and an engineering teacher? >> caller: yes, i was an engineer for it 12 years and i wanted to be on their schedule and wanted to be on their schedule and have summers off and then i got involved with a math program in the state of texas put engineering into the high school and so i was recruited into that field as well. and teaching mostly engineering now. a lot of hands-on projects that traditional math and science teachers don't have time to do. but i do feel this pressu
with the opposition leader. there are other foreign ministers. they are outspoken critics of russian policy towards ukraine. interestingly sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, they are port of the osce. the meeting has begun. it's not a meeting specifically about ukraine, but you would imagine that ukraine and the crisis here is bound it feature and there'll be different approaches round that table to what's happening here and what may happen next. >> barnaby, thank you for keeping us up to date on the situation there. thousands of people are risking their lives to make their way across the mediterranean sea to europe in the hope of a better life. hundreds have died as we reported here. more people are using a spanish enclave as a stepping stone. >> as soon as the gates open a rush of people flood back and forth between here and more o y okayo. a few metres separate the rest of africa from the gateway. more okayans coming through the border do to legally. many will do what they say. this side you are an spanish soil. it's beyond the med terrianian sea that people want to get to. >>
of one of obama's hidden foreign policy initiatives over the past five years. he is had secret negotiations me, the israelis, excuse with the radians, and we have seen him at the same time alienate many of our allies in the media it's -- in the mideast. doesn't this act is a clever ploy to keep the israelis from attacking and defending their own national interest -- >> the secret meetings with iranians, where'd you get that from? caller: that was in the press this past week. nott: the meetings have .een anything but on the p5+1 what you're talking about now is making sure and verifying, the whole idea was for iran to not having nuclear weapons. if we had gone in this manner before with iraq, where we railroad -- were able to go and massy no weapons of instruction there, let defectors go where they want unfettered, then maybe we would have been able to avoid the thousands of , thecan lives that we lost devastation to our economy that we had. cy as go, give diplomas chance. if in fact around does not live up to the agreement, we have 20 of time and the ability to do -- toings, to
of all for the bank of england, -- not least of all for the bank of england, monetary policy. he might have something about the foreign ownership, a banner issue in london. you being tax on the sale of your ownership if you're a foreign owner. something to do with -- this is the politics of politics. going up against the opposition chancellor saying plan a worked. didn't really work or have things gotten better? they have, thankfully. there will be politics in the houses of parliament, the house of westminster behind me. for married couples. there could be a sting in the tail from foreign owners. 11:15 london time. one day late. much, ourou so markets and are manus cranny. we will bring you chancellor osborne's autumn statement at 11:15 london time. followed by the bank of england rate decision at noon london time, you can watch both here on bloomberg. american brands opening their doors and london. the latest is how where company westbound -- homeware come in the west elm. caroline hyde went to met the ceo. u.k. the talk of the economy turning around. >> yes, we had j.crew coming as w
the world. the problem is, while it may be a competitive problem, the united states public policy established that u.s. companies are simply not going to be allowed to engage in corruption and bribery in foreign countries. it is not whether or not it is a competitive disadvantage. it is whether it is illegal. it is clear that it is illegal. we will find out. >> to your point, how is this any different than banks here hiring former treasury officials? >> tim geithner did not go to work for pincus because they liked the haircut he has. he has connections. >> look at peter at citigroup. >> wall street is a revolving door. people go there. it is not necessarily corrupt, but it is the same thing. >> certain people are hired to get certain deals. we showed some of the biggest cases in the last year. the big french oil company with operations in the u.s. had to pay money because they were accused by the ftc of having a set of fake contracting bids. to get access to oil fields in the middle east. those were very direct quid pro quo's. the challenge is to look at those places and documents
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)